How To Protect Yourself From COVID-19 When You Go Back To Work

How To Protect Yourself From COVID-19 When You Go Back To Work
Information and guidance for protection and personal protective equipment (PPE) from COVID-19 when you go back to work.

 

The CDC recommends effective hand hygiene (no hand shaking, frequent hand cleaning), frequent work area cleaning (with a disinfectant), and social distancing (maintaining 6 ft separation).

This can be done by stepping back when the customer steps to the counter or maintaining a safe distance from co-workers when in the same room. These measures when correctly practiced have proven to be the best protection for the employee and customers to prevent the spread of communicable diseases that everyone are exposed to every day moving forward.

The following are information and guidance for protection and personal protective equipment from COVID-19.

 

Virus transmission and Social Distancing

  • COVID-19 is transmitted through respiratory droplets and surfaces. 
  • Based on multiple research studies the virus is spread primarily through respiratory droplet transmission with decreasing concentration to approximately 6 feet where there are minimal particles. This supports the recommended distance of 6 feet for social distancing. 
  • Virus that lands on surfaces including hands can remain active for varying amounts of time, depending on the surface, temperature and other factors thus cleaning of frequently touched surfaces is recommended. 

 

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) General

  • Most PPE is designed to create a physical barrier not an infection barrier
  • PPE does not provide a higher level of protection for otherwise healthy individuals in a retail setting and has been shown to increase infection rates if used inappropriately. 
  • PPE is reserved for high risk exposure scenarios such as doctors or nurses in hospitals that are directly involved in providing prolonged care of COVID-19 patients or healthcare providers involved in mobile COVID-19 testing. 

 

Masks

  • Current recommendations for surgical masks is they are ONLY to be worn by a sick person, to decrease the volume and distance of virus transmission.
  • Surgical masks filter exhalation much less so on inhalation. They protect from virus “going out”, not from the virus from “coming in”. 
  • A person wearing a surgical mask does not significantly decrease the amount of virus coming to them.
  • Even with an N95 mask, a proper fitting is required and must be tested every time it is put on.

 

Gloves

  • Contamination while wearing gloves commonly occurs touching the face while wearing or during removal of gloves as virus accumulates on the surface of the glove and can be transmitted in the process. 
  • Wearing gloves is not a substitute for hand hygiene. Hand hygiene must be followed after glove removal to reduce viral spreading. 
  • Gloves, like masks, are primarily used to stop the transmission from the sick person, not to prevent receiving the virus. 

 

CDC How To Remove Gloves Poster

 

 

Hand Washing

  • CDC recommends regular hand hygiene including frequent hand washing, (or hand sanitizing when not available), no handshaking). 
  • Avoid touching face as virus on your hands can be transmitted if you touch your face. 

 

CDC Wash Your Hands Poster

 

CDC Wash Your Hands Poster
CDC Wash Your Hands Poster

 

Proper Hand Washing Techniques With Soap & Water or HandSanitizers

 

Hand Washing Techniques With Soap & Water
Hand Washing Techniques With Soap & Water

 

Proper Hand Washing Techniques With HandSanitizers
Proper Hand Washing Techniques With HandSanitizers

 

CDC Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Posters

 

CDC Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Poster 1
Sequence For Putting On Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

 

CDC Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Poster 2
How To Safely Remove Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Example 1

 

CDC Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Poster 3
How To Safely Remove Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Example 2

 

 

Important COVID-19 Resources & Links

 

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