COVID-19 MOST Frequently Asked Questions In The World

coronavirus
The MOST frequently asked questions in the WORLD about COVID-19, Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan Virus. What to DO and What NOT to do.

 

Information Provide by NeoCiti NEWS Network.

Most frequently asked questions in the world compiled, translated, analyzed, and consolidated from 51 countries. See below (Resource & Links) for the complete list.

 

DAILY UPDATES – Check back for more information.

 


 

The CDC recommends the use of cloth face coverings, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

 

< UPDATE- 04/03/20 >

 

The CDC recommends the use of cloth face coverings, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

CDC continues to study the spread and effects of the novel coronavirus across the United States.  We now know from recent studies that a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (“asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (“pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms.  This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity—for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms.  In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

It is critical to emphasize that maintaining 6-feet social distancing remains important to slowing the spread of the virus.  CDC is additionally advising the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.  Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

This recommendation complements and does not replace the President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America, 30 Days to Slow the Spreadexternal icon, which remains the cornerstone of our national effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus.  CDC will make additional recommendations as the evidence regarding appropriate public health measures continues to develop.

 

 


 

The CDC recommends the use of cloth face coverings, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

 

< UPDATE- 04/01/20 >

 

COVID-19 Facts

FACT: Face masks will not prevent COVID-19 spread

  • Only patients with confirmed cases of COVID-19 and healthcare workers caring for them should wear masks. Further, the general public should stop buying masks as shortages could prevent healthcare professionals from acquiring them.

FACT: Younger, healthy people also need to take precautions

  • While most young, healthy people are at lower risk of becoming critically ill, it’s still important for those individuals to take precautions to prevent the spread.

Fact: Routine vaccinations can help prevent other respiratory illnesses

  • While there is not yet a specific vaccine for COVID-19, there are vaccines to help reduce the risk of flu, pneumonia and whooping cough in people with certain risk factors. Discuss your vaccination needs with your doctor or pharmacist.

 


 

The CDC recommends the use of cloth face coverings, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

 

< UPDATE- 03/23/20 >

What do I do if I feel sick?

If you begin to feel ill, even with mild symptoms, manage them as you would if you had the flu. Stay at home, in a separate room from your family if possible, and avoid public places until you recover. Rest, use fever reducers (if needed) and keep at least six feet away from other people when possible. If you develop a cough and/or have difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider to discuss your symptoms and travel history, and you’ll be advised how to best proceed.

 

Who is at higher risk for getting COVID-19?

According to the CDC, older adults and people with serious chronic medical conditions, such as heart or lung disease or diabetes, seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19. Your healthcare provider can recommend additional steps you may be able to take to protect yourself.

 

What do I do if I’ve tested positive for COVID-19?

In the U.S., COVID-19 can only be confirmed with a laboratory test. Outside of the U.S., sometimes COVID-19 is diagnosed based on symptoms only. If you’ve been diagnosed with COVID-19, you should follow your healthcare provider’s instructions very closely, avoid public places and wear a mask if you have to be around other people. Those caring directly for you should wear masks when they are with you as well. You will need to practice self-isolation.

 


 

The CDC recommends the use of cloth face coverings, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

 

< UPDATE- 03/06/20 >

Prevention Matters 

While there’s been an increase in the confirmed number of COVID-19 cases nationally, with pockets of moderate to high activity, the general health risk to anyone in the U.S. is still considered by the CDC to be low.  Continue to practice healthy habits to help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses, including:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or when soap is not available, use a hand sanitizer that has at least 60 percent alcohol;
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick;
  • Stay home when you’re sick, except to get medical care;
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue; and
  • Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily.

 

What is self-isolation?

If you are told to self-isolate or self-quarantine, you must stay in your home, preferably in a room away from the rest of your household members, wear a mask if you go out to the doctor’s office and avoid visitors. Anyone coming into your room should also wear a mask. You should continue to follow everyday illness prevention practices, include washing your hands often, covering coughs and sneezes and disinfecting your home environment.

 

What is social distancing?

Social distancing is intentionally increasing the physical space between people (at least six feet), as well as minimizing social contact, to avoid spreading illness. Examples include avoiding crowds, working from home instead of going into the office and visiting with loved ones via electronic device instead of in person.

 

Why is social distancing recommended?

In general, the larger the gathering, the more opportunities there are for person-to-person contact and therefore greater risk of spreading COVID-19 virus. A COVID-19 outbreak could last a long time in your community. Depending on the severity of the outbreak, public health officials may recommend specific actions, such as closing schools and public locations, in order to help keep people healthy, reduce exposures to COVID-19 and slow the spread of the disease. These mitigation strategies are particularly important in order to slow the transmission of disease in order to protect:

  • Individuals at increased risk of severe illness, including older adults and persons of any age with underlying health conditions
  • Healthcare and critical infrastructure workforces

 


 

The CDC recommends the use of cloth face coverings, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

 

< UPDATE- 03/03/20 >

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a disease caused by a virus called SARS-CoV-2, a newly identified type of coronavirus also determined to cause an outbreak of respiratory illness, first detected in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. This outbreak began in early December 2019 and continues to grow. Chinese health officials have reported thousands of cases in the city of Wuhan and severe illness has been reported, including deaths.

Two other human coronaviruses, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV), have been known to cause severe symptoms.

 

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

The symptoms of this virus are difficult to distinguish, as they are similar to those of the common cold. Patients with confirmed COVID-19 have reportedly had mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of:

  • cough
  • shortness of breath
  • fever (may or may not be present)

The CDC believes at this time that symptoms of COVID-19 may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure as the incubation period is believed to be roughly 10 to 14 days.

 

Who is at risk for COVID-19?

Individuals who meet the following criteria are at risk:

  • Individuals who have a fever or symptoms of lower respiratory illness (e.g., cough, shortness of breath) AND were in close contact with a laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patient within 14 days of symptom onset OR traveled from a high-risk area within 14 days of symptom onset.

— OR —

  • Individuals who have a fever and symptoms of lower respiratory illness (e.g., cough, shortness of breath) requiring hospitalization AND a history of travel from high-risk areas within 14 days of symptom onset.

 

How is this virus diagnosed?

The CDC has developed a laboratory test that looks at the virus’ genetic material to identify the virus causing COVID-19.

 

Have many cases been reported?

At this time, the World Health Organization considers COVID-19 a public health emergency, but the general health risk to the American public is considered low. Declaring a public health emergency is how the WHO draws attention to a serious disease threat, engages the global community and gives countries guidance on how to contain the disease in order to avoid spread of the disease. Although the current risk in the U.S. is minimal with a limited number of confirmed cases, most patients have been hospitalized to keep them isolated until more is known about the disease. Up to date information can be found on the CDC website.

 

What is NeoCiti NEWS doing to monitor information regarding the virus?

NeoCitizen is continuously monitoring information from the CDC and WHO and strives to provide relevant updates as more information becomes available.

NeoCitizen is also continuously working with the world’s top news outlets and experts to bring your the most relevant and up to date news through our NeoCiti NEWS outlet and guides through NeoCitizen Guides.
Where can I find more information?

Visit CDC website or the WHO website for more information. County and/or state health departments will also will have updated local information. As there are numerous social media channels where people receive information, be sure to direct patients to the most accurate sources to avoid misinformation. Once again, if a case is suspected, refer the individual immediately to their health care provider.

 

What is being done about safety and cleaning within businesses and organizations that are still open?

Businesses and organizations are increasing the frequency of daily cleaning procedures, including cleaning high-traffic areas such as countertops and point-of-sale terminals. Government administration at the federal and local level are urging businesses and organizations to take appropriate protective steps such as wearing gloves during this cleaning process. All distribution centers are proactively pushing out additional cleaning and sanitization items to stores nationwide to help with safety and cleaning efforts.

 

What is the treatment for COVID-19?

There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19 infection. People infected with COVID-19 should receive supportive care.

 

What can I do to protect myself and my family from this virus?

At this time, there is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19 infection. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid exposure to this virus. The CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including:

  • Practice good hand washing after coughing or sneezing, using soap and water and washing your hands for at least 20 seconds. Avoid rubbing your eyes or putting your hand to your mouth until you have washed your hands
  • Wash your hands well after any contact with somebody else who is coughing or sneezing.
  • Observe respiratory etiquette. Cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, use tissues and throw them away immediately. Also, wash your hands afterwards.
  • Clean high touch surfaces, like door handles, light switches, countertops, etc., with a disinfectant.

 

A friend/family member and/or co-worker just visited a high-risk area. Should I be concerned I am infected if I have a cough, shortness of breath and a fever?

If you develop these symptoms after exposure to someone who has been in a high-risk area, you should be evaluated by a health care provider.

 

Is wearing a face mask or gloves effective prevention?

Although people may elect to wear surgical masks or gloves per their personal preference, their effectiveness is limited. Currently, the CDC or WHO does not recommend wearing masks unless you have respiratory symptoms (coughing or sneezing), have suspected COVID-19 infection with mild symptoms or are caring for someone with suspected COVID-19 infection. The everyday preventive actions are the best precautions to take for protection against COVID-19, similar to when coming in contact with those infected with a cold or flu.

 

Someone at work or someone I know that I have spent an extended time with in an inclosed space just informed us that they might have or know someone with COVID-19. Whom should we inform?

Having been in a high-risk area, or being near someone from high-risk area does not mean you are exposed to this virus. If a health care provider suspects that someone may have this virus based on their symptoms and possible exposure history, they will contact the department of health.

 

What should I do if an individual at work just informed us that they might have, or know someone with, COVID-19?

Exposure to people who do not have symptoms (mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of cough, shortness of breath or fever, which may or may not be present) presents no identifiable risk. Coming into contact with people who do have these symptoms requires “self-monitoring” of your health. Contact your health care provider if you have these symptoms, and continue to practice social distancing, good hygiene and good cough and sneezing etiquette. All site employees should continue to practice social distancing, good hygiene, and good cough and sneezing etiquette.

 

I was in contact with someone who has now been self-quarantined. Do I have to observe self- quarantine?

No, you have to self-monitor your health (contact your health care provider if you have mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of cough, shortness of breath fever, which may or may not be present), and continue to practice social distancing, good hygiene, and good cough and sneezing etiquette.

 

When does self-quarantine begin?

When you arrive in the U.S. from travel to one of the high-risk areas.

 

Is it safe to receive a letter, package or shipping container from a high-risk area? In addition, is it safe to purchase products made in a high-risk area?

Yes, it is safe to receive and open mail from high-risk areas.  Coronaviruses do not survive long on objects, such as letters or packages. WHO guidance indicates that transmission through inanimate objects are low risk at this point.

 

I handle money, credit cards, coupons, etc. Is there anything else I need to do to protect myself?

Exposure via surfaces is low. In alignment with basic hygiene practices, team members must wash their hands before and after using the restroom. In addition to this, it is highly recommended that team members wash their hands before and after any break, and use hand sanitizer intermittently throughout their shift.

 

If I am in close contact such as living with a patient with symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection or who was diagnosed clinically with COVID-19 infection outside of the U.S., what precautions should I follow?

The CDC recommendations in full can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/guidance-prevent-spread.html. In summary:

  • Household members should stay in another room or be separated from the patient as much as possible. Household members should use a separate bedroom and bathroom, if available.
  • Prohibit visitors who do not have an essential need to be in the home.
  • Household members should care for any pets in the home.
  • Make sure that shared spaces in the home have good airflow, such as by an air conditioner or an opened window, weather permitting.
  • Perform hand hygiene frequently. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60- to 95-percent alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • You and the patient should wear a face mask if you are in the same room.
  • Wear a disposable face mask and gloves when you touch or have contact with the patient’s blood, stool or body fluids, such as saliva, sputum, nasal mucus, vomit and urine.
  • Throw out disposable face masks and gloves after using them. Do not reuse. When removing personal protective equipment, first remove and dispose of gloves. Then, immediately clean your hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Next, remove and dispose of face mask, and immediately clean your hands again with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid sharing household items such as dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, bedding or other items. After the patient uses these items, wash them thoroughly.
  • Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Clean all “high-touch” surfaces, such as counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets and bedside tables, every day. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool or body fluids on them.
  • Immediately remove and wash clothes or bedding that have blood, stool or body fluids on them.
  • Wear disposable gloves while handling soiled items and keep soiled items away from your body. Clean your hands (with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer) immediately after removing your glovesPlace all used disposable gloves, face masks and other contaminated items in a lined container before disposing of them with other household waste. Clean your hands (with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer) immediately after handling these items. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.

 

What does close contact mean? 

Close contact is defined as being within six feet for a prolonged period, or being on an airplane, seated within two rows of a traveler with symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19.

 

When I went to my pharmacy, a person picking up their prescription was ill, had a mask and said they had COVID-19. Do I have to do anything? 

The CDC has established a way to evaluate your level of risk. Please note that these levels of risk are based on exposure to patients with symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection or who were diagnosed clinically with COVID-19 infection outside of the U.S. Coming into contact with people who do not have symptoms (mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of cough, shortness of breath or fever, which may or may not be present) presents no identifiable risk. 

Risk levels for people exposed to a patient with symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection or who were diagnosed clinically with COVID-19 infection outside of the U.S. are:

  • No identifiable risk: Walking by the patient or being briefly in the same room interacting with them as long as they do not meet any of the high-, medium-, or low-risk conditions below.
  • Low risk: Being in the same indoor environment (e.g., a pharmacy, store, classroom, hospital waiting room) for a prolonged period of time but not being in close contact.
  • Medium risk: 
    • Living in the same household as, caring for a patient at home, or having an intimate relationship with a patient while consistently using recommended precautions for home care and home isolation.
    • Travel from a high-risk area AND not having any exposures that meet a high-risk definition
    • Sitting within two seats of an ill traveler on an airplane.
  • High risk: Living in the same household as, caring for a patient at home, or having an intimate relationship with a patient without using recommended precautions.

 

Someone at work just returned from a trip to a high-risk area and has been working. What should I do?

The employee will need to leave work immediately and begin self-quarantining (14 days beginning the day the employee returned from their trip). For any questions related to pay please, call your human resources.  For most companies and small businesses, there are policies in place where the first 2 weeks of absence due to COVID-19 is payed and does not warrant the use of Paid Time Off or Sick Leave Benefits.  Being exposed to people who do not have symptoms of mild to severe respiratory illness such as cough, shortness of breath or fever (which may or may not be present) presents no identifiable risk. All on site employees should continue to practice social distancing, good hygiene, and good cough and sneezing etiquette.

 

A friend/family member and/or team member just visited a high-risk area*. Should I be concerned I am infected if I have a cough, shortness of breath and a fever? 

If you develop these symptoms after exposure to someone who has been in a high-risk area, you should be evaluated by a health care provider.

 

What is the effectiveness of certain antivirals being used for COVID-19.

At this time, there is no approved treatment or vaccine available for COVID-19. The use of antivirals and other chemical entities used in other countries is strictly experimental for treatment of COVID-19. If prescribed, the medication can still be dispensed similar to an off-label use medication. Please document appropriately and continue to recommend evidence-based disease prevention strategies as recommended by the CDC to help protect against COVID-19.

 

Patients are asking about stockpiling medications in the case of a COVID-19 pandemic. What should I tell them?

Pharmacies works diligently to dispense medications for patients during challenging or emergency situations. Patients can look to the FDA or CDC, who are monitoring the situation and providing the necessary guidance for preparedness in this situation. Patients can contact their doctor or pharmacist with medication-related concerns.

 

 

Important COVID-19 Resources & Links

 

Global Research & Survey Sites (Group by number of entries)

  • United States, Canada, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Mexico, Netherlands, Brazil, South Africa
  • Columbia, France, Kenya, Philippines, Austria, Belgium, China, Guatemala, Indonesia, Russia
  • Vietnam, Albania, Argentina, Aruba, Barbados, Botswana, Switzerland, Chile, Finland, Ghana
  • Ireland, Israel, Iceland, Jamaica, South Korea, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Sri Lanka, Lithuania, Moroco
  • Malaysia, Nigeria, Peru, Poland, Serbia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Taiwan, Ukraine, Venezuela, Zambia

NOTE: Grouped by number of queries per country.

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